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Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Puppy Forced To Drink Vodka?

This image has been shared on Facebook too many times to count since first being posted in 2012. The guy in the photo in Ontaria Canada had this image taken as a joke, it was a hoax of poor taste...He has since apologized publicly after the police were led to his whereabouts.

Click the link below to read the article and the police statement and the statement from the guy in pic too... 
 http://www.hoax-slayer.com/vodka-puppy.shtml

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Malaysian Mother Beating Her Baby Daughter

A video of a  teenage Malaysian mother beating her baby daughter has generated a storm of outrage online a year after it was filmed, prompting the Malaysian Police to announce that the woman is already serving an 18-month prison sentence for the offense. 

By the way, the person holding the video camera only did so to prove to the authorities that this abuse was happening to the baby.

I did want to post the actual video here as I feel it's too upsetting; but if you choose to view it here's a link to the actual video:
Malaysian Womans Beats Baby
  
More on this story here:
www.cnn.com/malaysia-child-abuse-video

Monday, May 19, 2014

Mother Banned For Posting Photos of Baby; Now Images Go Viral Scam


 I become so agitated when I see post like this on Face Book. This Mother had their photo copied from Facebook to be used in a fake post. The image below is self-explanatory, but it has 66,000 Likes and almost 500,000 Shares!! I just don't get it; why do people do this sort of thing?  Likers and Sharers are just as guilty in my opinion. Haven't these people learned how to Google? If researching before sharing posts is too complicated or time consuming, then how about at least reading the comments on the original post. Most likely, scrolling the comment section under any given post, will clue you in to it's authenticity. Otherwise do not pass on this false information by Liking, or Sharing.

I see these types of viral images every single day on Facebook and work hard to prove or disprove them at www.facebookviralimagessolved.blogspot.com because the madness needs to stop.

The true story of this Mother and her infant, is that her newborn baby passed only eight hours after being born on February 15, 2012. She posted the photos to share with family and friends as a memorial to her precious child. I am thinking that possibly enough people clicked that little "report image" link that Facebook heeded the request and removed the image. When the Mother continued to re-posted the photos, her account was eventually closed. The news story can be seen here
Facebook bans mother for posting photos of baby with birth defec - KCTV5

I am not sure as to the current post that is traveling through the Newsfeeds on Facebook (publicly) But it looks like some scam or scheme to gain sympathy for this made-up accident in which to gain monetarily and that sickens me. Hasn't this family has been through enough already?
 To conclude: Although it's only been 2 years or so since this family endured such a loss, I wish them the best. Rest in Peace baby Grayson.

Friday, May 2, 2014

Milky Way- The Heaven's Trail Myth

    en.wikipedia.org                                         www.500px.com/ThomasZ                                google image search

 I recently received a comment on my Pinterest board  asking me if I had seen a particular image (center photo above), a viral image infamously known and captioned as "Heaven's Trail". My curiosity got the best of me as it often does. I was led to her article titled The true Tale of "Heaven's Trail" and then later found a great article here written by Thomas Zimmer himself. As I continued with my research on the seemingly phenomenal photo, that included captions like “There’s a place in Ireland where every 2 years, the stars line up with this trail on June 10th-June 18th. It’s called the Heaven’s Trail.” 

Although the photo was taken at Island Sylt, North Sea, as described in Zimmer's article, the rest of the hype is just plain nonsense created by someone's fantasy and then passed on and on by the most gullible people. According to Zimmer the photo is very real with no special photoshop effects. Maybe a few filtering and enhancements in my opinion, but overall a real image taken with a real camera.

I included various keywords in my search, such as; Milky Way, Heaven's Trail and so on....I quickly came to the conclusion that the photographer gained a lot of attention. Having an image go viral, giving way for a photographer/artist to further gain his popularity. If I were him, I would post my site url on every forum, blog, etc. that I could find and baste in the glory and debunk any falsities in the process.

Below I included quite a few Milky Way mythologies among other cultures. I wonder if one day, in the very distant future will the Heavens Trail myth be included in such a list. Just for fun, I added a cyber-culture myth below.


Mythology among cultures (quoted from en.wikipedia.org)

Armenian

Ancient Armenian mythology called the Milky Way the "Straw Thief's Way". According to legend, the god Vahagn stole some straw from the Assyrian king Barsham and brought it to Armenia during a cold winter. When he fled across the heavens, he spilled some of the straw along the way.

Khoisan

The Khoisan people of the Kalahari desert in southern Africa say that long ago there were no stars and the night was pitch black. A girl, who was lonely and wanted to visit other people, threw the embers from a fire into the sky and created the Milky Way.

Cherokee

A Cherokee folktale tells of a dog who stole some cornmeal and was chased away. He ran away to the north, spilling the cornmeal along the way. The Milky Way is thus called "The Way the Dog Ran Away".

Eastern Asia

Peoples in Eastern Asia believed that the hazy band of stars was the "Silvery River" of Heaven.  In one story, the stars Altair and Vega were said to be two lovers who were allowed to meet only once a year on the seventh day of the seventh month, when a flock of magpies and crows formed a bridge over the galactic river.

Egyptian

In Egyptian mythology, the Milky Way was considered a pool of cow's milk. It was deified as a fertility cow-goddess by the name of Bat. Among the Finns, Estonians and related peoples, the Milky Way was and is called "The Pathway of the Birds". The Finns observed that the migratory birds used the galaxy as a guideline to travel south, where they believed Lintukoto (bird home) resided. In Estonian folklore it is believed that the birds are led by a white bird with the head of a maiden who chases birds of prey away. Only later did scientists indeed confirm this observation; the migratory birds use the Milky Way as a guide to travel to warmer, southern lands during the winter.

Mesopotamian

In Mesopotamian mythology the tail of Tiamat became the Milky Way. Another myth about Labbu is similar interpreted.


Greek and Roman

The Greek name for the Milky way is derived from the word for milk. One legend explains how the Milky Way was created by Heracles when he was a baby. His father, Zeus, was fond of his son, who was born of the mortal woman Alcmene. He decided to let the infant Heracles suckle on his divine wife Hera's milk when she was asleep, an act which would endow the baby with godlike qualities. When Hera woke up and realized that she was breastfeeding an unknown infant, she pushed him away and the spurting milk became the Milky Way.
(older Greek Myths not included)

Hindu

In the Hindu collection of stories called Bhagavata Purana, all the visible stars and planets moving through space are likened to a dolphin that swims through the water, and the heavens is called śiśumãra cakra, the dolphin disc. The Milky Way forms the abdomen of the dolphin and is called Akasaganga which means "The Ganges River of the Sky".

Hungarian

In Hungarian mythology, Csaba, the mythical son of Attila the Hun and ancestor of the Hungarians is supposed to ride down the Milky Way when the Székelys (ethnic Hungarians living in Transylvania) are threatened. Thus the Milky Way is called "The Road of the Warriors" Hungarian: Hadak Útja. The stars themselves are sparks from the horseshoes.

For more information on Milky Walk Mythology visit en.wikipedia.org 

Cyber-culture 
abstract

During the Millennium Age, between the Age of Aquarius and the Age of Pisces, humanity entered into a time of awakening. Some religious in nature, praying that their souls will find their way to a utopian- like place in the Kingdom of Heaven. When such seekers came across an image on the World Wide Web, that was deemed as being "Heaven's Trail" (captured by the infamous Thomas Zimmer)- those seekers imagined it would lead them to a place to dwell peacefully for all eternity. 

With any spiritual notion comes a scientific theory.

Galileo first turned his telescope on the Milky Way in 1609; this was one of his major discoveries. It wasn't until a couple of centuries later that astronomers began to realize that this band of stars was in fact the local version of the "spiral nebulae" that astronomers were discovering all over the sky.
Learn more about the Milky Way here




For more information on Milky Walk Mythology visit en.wikipedia.org

Thursday, May 1, 2014

800 Pound Snake Pulled From Chicago Lake?


 I firmly believe the snake was caught and held in front of the camera at close range (most likely by the guy taking the photo) which obviously would make the snake appear much larger than it really is. As an added bonus the backhoe in the background creates the illusion that the snake is being hoisted...good one!

Careful what you click on folks! This here is a scam read on to learn more.

Here's an article I found www.theepochtimes.com

A viral Facebook post is saying an 800-pound snake was pulled out a Chicago, Ill., lake, but it’s just a scam.
The post has a well-used image that was taken in Indonesia a few years ago of what appears to by a reticulated python being held by a tractor. There’s no video footage of a snake that large in Chicago.
Similar Facebook scams have used the same snake image under different pretexts, including a scam of that very same snake being found in North Carolina.
When one clicks on the post, they’re taken to a website that prompts them to share first before going further. This allows the posts to be spread even further, which can make money for the scammers.
After that, users are taken to a page that displays surveys that also generate revenue for the scammers. It’s not recommended to fill these out.
“Once on the website, the victim will be asked to complete surveys or share the same website before he/she can view the video. Now, sharing this web page will only help spread this scam to other Facebook users. And, completing the surveys will only generate revenue for the cybercriminals behind this scam,” says security website Online Threat Alerts about similar scams. “The victim on the other hand, will not be able to view the video that they were promised, because it doesn’t exist.”
“If you have shared this scam, remove the share Facebook post from your Timeline or Wall, because this will help stop the spreading of this scam.”
Facebook has promised to clean up spam recently, but the company has a lot of work to do.
“Some stories in News Feed use inaccurate language or formatting to try and trick people into clicking through to a website that contains only ads or a combination of frequently circulated content and ads. For instance, often these stories claim to link to a photo album but instead take the viewer to a website with just ads,” Facebook said earlier this month.

The Jesus PC Illusion


How does the Jesus optical illusion work?

By staring at the illusion for so long in one place, the light from your monitor temporarily makes an impression within your eye on the light receptors. When you look up and blink at the wall or ceiling, the image becomes more clearly visible to you in a negative form. Since it was a negative image to begin with, you have reversed the image back into a positive.

To prove this theory, I opened the image in a photo editing program and selected "invert colors" from the drop down menu...
                                   Before                                                                      After

Syrian child found sleeping near the graves of his parents?


 


The art project of Saudi Arabian photographer Abdel Aziz Al-Atibi was staged using his very own nephew and fake graves, but picked up on social media networks and captioned as being a picture of a Syrian child found sleeping near the graves of his parents.
  
January 3, 2014. He posted the image on Instagram, with the text; "Some kids might feel that their dead parents' bodies are more affectionate to them than the people they're living with." Al-Atibi; later remarked; "I'm a photographer and I try to talk about the suffering that is happening in society, it's my hobby and my exaggeration is intended to deliver my idea."  

Source: www.beirut.com